Friday, July 31, 2015

Family History Friday - Sloan, Allen, McArthur, McPherson

A photo album has just been donated to the museum collection and none of them are labelled.  The only writing we can find refers to Johnny Sloan, 1887.  If you have any idea who these people are or what family they may belong to (most likely Sloan, McArthur, Allen and others), please contact us.  The photo album is full so we will be posting more photographs over the next few weeks for Family History Fridays.  
Angela Bobier 519-762-3072  info@backuspagehouse.ca 




Wednesday, July 29, 2015

World War Wednesdays: The Silver Cross Mother


     Attending a Remembrance Day ceremony at which a Silver Cross Mother is present adds an additional element of sorrow to the day. Your heart goes out to the lady who has lost more than you could ever imagine, and you know that there is nothing anyone could ever do to ease that pain. War has a strange way of creating sadness across so many dimensions, whether it reaches you directly or just seeing it from a distance is enough to make it real. This week, we'll discuss what it means to be a Silver Cross Mother, along with the story of Mrs. Charlotte Susan Wood, with information courtesy of veterans.gc.ca.

     Every year, the Royal Canadian Legion selects a National Memorial (Silver) Cross Mother to represent the mothers of Canada at the national Remembrance Day Ceremony in Ottawa. She will lay a wreath at the base of the National War Memorial on behalf of all mothers who lost children in the military service to their nation. During her year-long tenure, which begins on November 1st, she performs other official duties, as required. The Memorial Cross (usually referred to as the Silver Cross) is awarded to mothers and widows of Canadian soldiers who died on active duty or whose death was consequently attributed to such duty. 

     In 1936, Mrs. Charlotte Susan Wood of Winnipeg, Manitoba became known as the first National Memorial (Silver) Cross Mother. Mrs. Wood immigrated with part of her family from Britain to take up a 160 acre Dominion Land Grant northwest of Edmonton in 1905. Of the eleven of Mrs. Wood’s sons/stepsons that signed up to serve with either the Canadian or British army during the First World War, five did not return. 

     On September 22, 1914, her son, Petty Officer Stoker Louis Robert Wood, was lost at sea while serving with the Royal Navy, HMS Hogue.
     On June 4, 1915, a second son, Able Seaman Harry Wood, was killed at Gallipoli while serving with Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.
     On October 7, 1916, a third son, Private Francis Wood, was killed at the Somme while serving with the Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment).
     On May 5, 1917, a fourth son, Private Peter Percy Wood, was killed at Vimy Ridge while serving with the Canadian Infantry (Saskatchewan Regiment).
     On November 3, 1917, a fifth son, Leading Seaman Joseph Wood, was killed at Passchendaele while serving with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.

     Mrs. Wood was awarded the George V Jubilee Medal in 1935. While on a pilgrimage to attend the unveiling of the Vimy Ridge Memorial in July 1936, Mrs. Wood was presented to King Edward VIII. Seizing the opportunity she said to him, "I have just been looking at the trenches and I just can’t figure out why our boys had to go through that." He replied, “Please God, Mrs. Wood. It shall never happen again.”
     

     Canada’s famous war mother died three years later, just weeks after the start of another world war. She was buried in an unmarked grave in Winnipeg’s Brookside Cemetery. A new gravestone was erected over 60 years later.

     An incredible story of incredible loss, it is a testament to how devastating war can be on all fronts.

     Thanks for reading,
       Delany

Monday, July 27, 2015

Memory Mondays- The Heritage Farm Show






















Hello everyone!

I hope your Monday is proving to be a positive start to your week.  Today we are looking back on our Heritage Farm Shows of the past.  This event always brings lots of really neat farm equipment, tractors and heritage farm enthusiasts!  Each year visitors enjoy demonstrations, food, music and learning, and this year is shaping up to be the same!  So come on out to see and learn about all of the old farm implements that will be featured, along with a threshing machine and activities for the kids.  The fun takes place from September 12-13 this year here at the museum and we hope to see you out. Have a great rest of your week!


Memory Monday - Unidentified Willson Children

This picture was sent to us by Brenda Corby in the hopes someone will be able to identify these two children.  She believes there is a connection to the Willson family, possibly some Michigan relatives.  
If you know anything about these little ones, please contact our office 519-762-3072 or info@backuspagehouse.ca

Sunday, July 26, 2015

Behind The Scenes of Beds, Baths, and Beyond #12

Hair
·       Most didn’t wash their hair very often, but there were other ways of keeping it “healthy.”  Women brushed their hair more than 100 times a day to make it shiny.  To treat dandruff, they rubbed bran into their scalp.
·       Brushing and combing your hair would dislodge dirt and also spread the natural oils and fluids across the length of the hair, improving its conditions. 
·       As the century developed, the habit of washing one’s hair with water began to be promoted.  A range of washes for the hair were widely recommended, most of which were relatively basic.  Rosemary water was particularly popular. It removed more grease than just water. 

·       By the 1840s, occasional washing of men’s hair with water was creeping in, led by women, who had adopted the process first.  For most, it meant a swill around in cold water to dislodge the dust and dirt, but some were willing to risk soap, although it did tend to leave the scalp sore in some people. 


Saturday, July 25, 2015

Seedy Saturday- Thyme


Happy Saturday everyone!  This week, take some thyme to learn about another popular herb.
 

 

There are over 350 species of thyme, such as creeping thyme, which is a good ground coverer and lemon thyme which emits a strong scent resembling lemons.  The kind grown most often to cook with is a shrub reaching 1 foot tall, with small, oval, aromatic leaves, accompanied by tiny clusters of purple flowers in summer. 

A large number of species are native to areas within the Mediterranean.  The Etruscans and Egyptians used thyme for embalming and the Greeks used it as a temple incense, as the word “Thymus” means “courage” or “to fumigate” in Greek.  The soldiers of Rome bathed in thyme water to give themselves vigor, and it was also thought to be a good herb for medicinal purposes.  This herb was introduced to the English by the Romans and ladies would embroider sprigs of thyme on scarves for their knights, as it was a symbol of courage during the Middle Ages.  More practically used however, branches would be burned and thrown on the floor to cleanse homes. 

As a medicine, thyme was used to relieve asthma, bronchitis and whooping cough.  Hookworm could also be ejected with this herb, but like many essential oils, it can be fatal if a high enough dose is ingested.  When used externally, it can also cause irritation to the skin.  In a food dish however, it is quite good with soups, eggs, meats, breads, tomatoes and other vegetables. 
Take care,
Catie Welch

Friday, July 24, 2015

Family History Friday - Help Name These Photographs

All season we have been featuring a photo album new to the museum collection, where none of the photographs are labelled.  The only writing we can find refers to Johnny Sloan, 1887 and a Ms. McPherson of Wallacetown.  If you have any idea who these people are or what family they may belong to (most likely Sloan, McArthur, McPherson, Allen and others), please contact us.  The photo album is full so we will be posting more photographs over the next few weeks for Family History Fridays.  
Angela Bobier 519-762-3072  info@backuspagehouse.ca 




Thursday, July 23, 2015

Events to Attend this Week at the Backus-Page House Museum

Hi everyone, don't forget to make time to come check out some of the exciting events happening at the museum! 

Victorian Teas run every Sunday from 1:00pm-4:00pm. Enjoy baked goods and tea in the Parlour, followed by a tour of the museum. The cost is only $10.00/person. 

Enjoy a tour of the museum as well as the barn! Homestead Days at the Backus-Page House Museum runs every Tuesday-Friday in July and August. This exhibit of antique agricultural tools and implements is a MUST see! 

History Day Camp runs every Thursday in July and every Wednesday in August. Themes include; Confederation, The Railroad, WW1, Roaring 20's, Dirty 30's, WW2, We Love the 50's and 60's, the Fur Trade and the 70's and 80's! Tons of exciting crafts and activities planned! Pre-register your child(ren) today! 

The Backus-Page House Museum's location is one of a kind! It's the perfect location for picnics, family outings and trail walks! The scenery is absolutely beautiful and can be enjoyed by all!



For more information call us at the museum 519-762-3072.

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

World War Wednesdays: Profile of a Local Hero


     So far, I've done a number of features in recognition of some of the major faces of both world wars, including some of our well-known local heroes. In contrast, one of my main goals and most valued aspects of working at Elgin County Archives is discovering more about the vast number of regular Elgin County boys who enlisted and did their hometowns proud. I have wanted to start featuring the stories of some local heroes on here as a way to ensure that their contributions are never forgotten, and I stumbled across one in particular that is a perfect first feature. This week, we're focusing on Arthur Freeman, a St. Thomas veteran of both world wars and example of a true humble hero. All content is courtesy of Elgin County Archives, with gratitude.

     In January of 1980, the St. Thomas Times-Journal interviewed 83-year-old Arthur Freeman, who had a number of memories and reflections to share with readers. He posed for the camera holding his military medal for extraordinary bravery during the First World War, which bore the description: "For conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during operations on Passchendaele Ridge from Oct. 29 to Nov. 2, 1917 "He remained on duty during almost the whole of this period himself. At all times, notwithstanding heavy hostile fire, he kept his gun in action and his crew organized for attack. During the intense enemy barrage on the night of Oct. 31, his platoon officer gave him permission to withdraw from his section to a less exposed position, which he declined to take advantage of, pointing out that he desired to be in readiness for any counter attack  and held this post, protected his gun from becoming mud-clogged by lying himself along side it. Throughout he did more than his duty at all times". If you remember anything about the First World War and the meaning of the word 'Passhcendaele', you'll know that's a big deal.

    Mr. Freeman, however, had his own feelings about the infamous embodiment of hell on earth. After having seen the movies; read the books and articles, he asserted that everyone has a different account of what happened. He said that people often associated Passchendaele with mud, but he remembers it being worse at the Somme."We lived like bloody rats, deep in the trenches," He said. "You learned to keep your head down."

     Indeed, Mr. Freeman was a good authority on conditions of all the major First World War battles- he saw action at Passchendaele, The Somme, Vimy Ridge, and Ypres. Reflecting on those experiences, he said, "I often sit here and think how we lived. But a hundred people could write the history of the war as they saw it ... there wouldn't be two of them alike."

     As the story's headline proclaims, even heroes come in small packages. In his reflections, Arthur admitted he was really too small physically to meet army regulations. "I was about three inches too small in the chest and a couple inches too short," he remembered. "I guess I was one of the smallest in the regiment. I wasn't big for my age." Remarkably, at just 21 years old and 5 feet, 3 1/2 inches tall, it was he who remained when others would have fled at Passchendaele. He single-handedly held off the enemy placing himself in extreme danger while protecting the men in his crew.

     Mr. Freeman's experiences can be seen as fortunate from the beginning. He joined the 91st Elgins in May of 1916 and was fighting by November. Remembering that rushed time, he said: "All we'd had was squad drill — it was bloody ridiculous. But they didn't have time to train us.. There we were, a bunch of kids. If the Germans had counter-attacked we would have had no idea what to do — we were so disorganized". Though he was hit twice with shrapnel and grazed once with a machine-gun bullet, remarkably, he was never injured seriously.

   Looking back on his experiences and referring to the present time, Arthur wondered, "You wonder why we have to have war... They should have learned from the last two wars .— nobody wins, everybody loses." While he felt honoured by receiving the military medal, he insisted that he had only done his duty, and regarded it as recognition of his entire experience, not just at Passchendaele. "I was more entitled to a medal at the Sommes in 1916 than at Passchendaele. But you do what you have to do and say to hell with it. That's the way I see it anyway."
Arthur Freeman, left, and Howard Vair, representing the 91st Overseas Battalion, lay a wreath in memory of the departed warriors during an annual reunion.

    Mr. Freeman finished his reflections with praise for the then-upcoming Elgin Military Museum, which he felt would be a valuable contribution to the county. He finished his interview by saying: "Kids today, or anybody... they read about it (the war) but they wonder what things really looked like... It's good to preserve history".

     That last part has really stuck with me, and I think about it often. It seems like a small message from the past that reinforces what I try to do every day, with the blog, my work, studies, and my writing. I hope that stories like Mr. Freeman's connect with you in the ways that they do with me, so that we can maintain our appreciation for the heroes like him for generations to come.

Thanks for reading,

      Delany

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Transcription Tuesday James Blackwood

Good Morning bloggers! I hope everyone’s week is off to a great start. For today’s Transcription Tuesday we will be looking at a page in the Blacksmith’s ledger addressed to James Blackwood. All information that we’ve obtained is from the Early History of Dunwich Township, published by the West Elgin Genealogical & Historical Society. If any of the information posted on this blog is incorrect or missing please feel free to contact us here at the Backus-Page House and we will do our best to provide our bloggers with the correct information.




James Blackwood along with his three brothers came to settle in Montreal in 1829 from Scotland.  James Blackwood worked as a clerk. Though dissatisfied with his occupation Blackwood soon began seeking interest in the Talbot Trail Settlement in 1833. It was at this point in his life that he would meet and marry Georgina Innes. The couple settled in Stirling (now part of St. Thomas). Here James would purchase and successfully run a store.

Blackwood as a Businessman
            Beginning in 1840 James Blackwood purchased Anison Gould’s Old Wollen Mill in Hog’s Hollow, St. Thomas. Eventually the old mill would be torn down and would make room for a six-storey frame Wollen Mill as well as a distillery in Hog’s Hollow. By 1848 James Blackwood had become one of the areas top businessmen. Unfortunately the new Mill would burn down in 1857. To re-establish himself and to uphold his reputation of such a successful businessman he would purchase 233 acres of Lot 8 in Concession 9 & 10 from George McBeth. Blackwood sold $16000 worth of town lots and spent $10000 of it building Mansion in Port Tyrconnell

Have a good week and don't forget to stop in for a visit!!!


Mon

Monday, July 20, 2015

Memory Mondays- Tea in the Parlour

Hello Everyone!



Today, we are fondly remembering our summer teas in the parlour here at the Backus-Page House Museum.  We serve tea every Sunday from 1-4, accompanied by delicious treats and a tour of the house.  In the past, we have had many lovely visitors here to join us for tea, some old and others new. The food, beverage and atmosphere have been enjoyed by all thus far and we are happy to provide a memorable Victorian experience for those who stop in.  We also take reservations, so be sure to call and book a spot for you and your family and friends!  Have a great week!

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Behind The Scenes of Beds, Baths, and Beyond #11

Brushing Your Teeth
·       Toothbrushes were not common, so people had to find other ways of keeping their mouth clean.  Some people brushed their teeth with frayed twigs and gunpowder and mouthwashes were made out of everything from lemon juice to wine.  Rubbing gums with wool that had been coated with honey helped to get rid of bad breath, but it was not a great way to fight cavities.
·       The first toothbrush was patented in 1857.
·       By later in the 19th century, toothbrushes looked the same in shape as they do today but had handles of bone or wood and bristles generally of horse or pony hair. 
·       The usual word for toothpaste was “dentifrice” and many such pastes were made at home with the simplest being no more than a little soot or salt.  Commercial forms could be bought over the counter, and most, whether home-made or bought were simply flavoured and often coloured abrasives—in effect, polishes. 
·       One recipe for such a polish was: coral, cuttlefish bone, dragons blood, burnt alum and red sanders, orris root, cloves and cinnamon, and rose pink, all to be powdered and mixed- was called American tooth powder.  The cuttlefish provided polish, gently abrading the teeth, burnt alum gave recipe a “medicated” taste and may have also had a small antibacterial effect.  The coral, dragon’s blood and rose pink were used for colouring and spices were added to give flavor and scent to breath.


Toothbrush patent drawing.  


Saturday, July 18, 2015

Seedy Saturday- Wheat


Happy Saturday everyone!  Today we are going to focus on a grain that is well-known to us.
 
 

Wheat is a cereal grain that is produced all over the world and is the biggest source of vegetable protein in our food.  Wheat grain is primarily used to make flour, but also for fermentation to make alcohol and biofuel.  As with many plants, wheat has classifications as well; 6 to be exact.  They include: hard red winter, hard red spring, soft red winter, durum (hard), hard white and soft white wheat.  The hard wheats are used for making bread, rolls and all-purpose flower, as they have the most gluten in them, while the soft wheats are used in flat bread, cakes, pastries, crackers, muffins and biscuits.  Wheat is also used as feed for livestock.

During the period of 1800-60, which is when the Backus family lived in Elgin County, agriculture in our area, and throughout Ontario, was composed mainly of wheat production. Wheat was the easiest crop to grow and sell, making it an important source of cash for settlers.  The main markets were Britain and Lower Canada, and the economy was that of boom-and-bust. The Corn Law was put into effect in 1820 and its restrictions closed our wheat out of British markets, which caused our wheat prices and land values to drop drastically.  The wheat market boomed again in 1825, but it collapsed again in 1834-35 with crop failures resulting in near starvation in many newly settled areas.

Friday, July 17, 2015

Family History Friday: More Unnamed Adults

A photo album has just been donated to the museum collection and none of them are labelled.  The only writing we can find refers to Johnny Sloan, 1887.  If you have any idea who these people are or what family they may belong to (most likely Sloan, McArthur, Allen and others), please contact us.  The photo album is full so we will be posting more photographs over the next few weeks for Family History Fridays.  
Angela Bobier 519-762-3072  info@backuspagehouse.ca 
  

  


Thursday, July 16, 2015

Events to attend @ the Backus-Page House Museum

Happy Thursday everyone! It is sad to think that summer is flying by so quickly but don't worry you still have time to come out to the museum to experience Victorian Tea, tours of the 1850's house, Homestead days and History Day Camp! 

Victorian Teas run every Sunday from 1:00pm-4:00pm. Enjoy baked goods and tea in the Parlour, followed by a tour of the museum. The cost is only $10.00/person. 

Enjoy a tour of the museum as well as the barn! Homestead Days at the Backus-Page House Museum runs every Tuesday-Friday in July and August. This exhibit of antique agricultural tools and implements is a MUST see! 

History Day Camp runs every Thursday in July and every Wednesday in August. Themes include; Confederation, The Railroad, WW1, Roaring 20's, Dirty 30's, WW2, We Love the 50's and 60's, the Fur Trade and the 70's and 80's! Tons of exciting crafts and activities planned! Pre-register your child(ren) today! 

The Backus-Page House Museum's location is one of a kind! It's the perfect location for picnics, family outings and trail walks! The scenery is absolutely beautiful and should be enjoyed by all!

For more information call us at the museum 519-762-3072.


Wednesday, July 15, 2015

World War Wednesdays: The Battle of Britain Anniversary


     This past week saw the 75th anniversary of the launch of the Battle of Britain during the Second World War, and that video of the Duke of Edinburgh definitely made sure it was in the news. The post for this week is all about what happened during that time, as part of the German plans for Operation Sea Lion. Winston Churchill was the new British Prime Minister at the time, so I hope you are a fan of his like I am, because he produced some of his greatest speeches during that period.
   
   
  1. Operation Sea Lion (German: Unternehmen Seelöwe) was Germany's plan to invade the United Kingdom during the Second World War, following the Fall of France. The entire plan relied on Germany having complete control of the English Channel, which, in turn meant that Germany had to have control of the skies so that the Royal Air Force could not attack German ships crossing the Channel. Hence victory in the Battle of Britain was an integral part of the plan.
  2. Head of the Luftwaffe Hermann Göering, on the right, overlooking the white cliffs of  Dover, England
         Operation Sealion looked simple in theory because geographically, Britain should have been an easy target. The Luftwaffe was very experienced in modern warfare, and the Wehrmacht had experienced astonishing success since the attack on Poland and the British had lost a vast amount of military hardware after the evacuation from the beaches of Dunkirk. The RAF and the Army in Britain looked weak; only the Royal Navy seemed to offer Britain some semblance of protection. It is said that Hitler was prepared to offer Britain generous peace terms. However, on May 21st, 1940, Admiral Raeder told Hitler about a plan to invade Britain and Hitler, it is said, was taken in by the plan. 
  3.      It was only when it became clear that Britain would not sign peace terms that Hitler gave his backing to an invasion. On July 2nd 1940, Hitler gave his first tentative orders regarding a possible invasion of Britain. It stated that
    “a landing in England is possible, providing that air superiority can be attained and certain other necessary conditions fulfilled…..all the preparations must be made on the basis that the invasion is still only a plan, and has not yet been decided upon.” Hitler, July 2nd 1940
  4.      Towards the end of June 1940, Hitler finally gave the order for the German military to make plans for an invasion of Britain, but they were one step ahead of him as all three branches of the German military had guessed that an invasion would be needed and had already started on their own plans. At a meeting with his service chiefs on July 21st, Hitler made it clear that he recognized that the plan had its dangers, but he was keen to press on with the plan so that he could turn his full attention to Russia once Britain had been defeated.
  5.      Beginning in July 1940, the Luftwaffe targeted its bomber campaign on coastal shipping convoys and shipping centres, such as Portsmouth. one month later, the attacks shifted to RAF airfields and infrastructure. As the battle progressed, the Luftwaffe also targeted factories involved in aircraft production and ground infrastructure. Eventually, it resorted to attacking areas of political significance and using terror bombing strategy such as the "Blitz" against British citizens to weaken morale.
  6. Children in the East End of London, made homeless by the Blitz
       Throughout the battle, the Germans greatly underestimated the size of the RAF and the scale of British aircraft production. Across the Channel, the Air Intelligence division of the Air Ministry consistently overestimated the size of the German air enemy and the productive capacity of the German aviation industry. As the battle was fought, both sides exaggerated the losses inflicted on the other by an equally large margin. However, the intelligence picture formed before the battle encouraged the Luftwaffe to believe that such losses pushed Fighter Command to the very edge of defeat, while the exaggerated picture of German air strength persuaded the RAF that the threat it faced was larger and more dangerous than was the case. Due to the failure of the Luftwaffe to establish air supremacy, a conference assembled on 14 September at Hitler's headquarters. Hitler concluded that air superiority had not yet been established and "promised to review the situation on 17 September for possible landings on 27 September or 8 October." Three days later, when the evidence was clear that the German Air Force had greatly exaggerated the extent of their successes against the RAF, Hitler postponed Sea Lion indefinitely. The Battle of Britain thus marked the first defeat of Hitler's military forces, with air superiority seen as the key to victory.
  7.      Ultimately, the Battle of Britain's legacy is that of utmost resiliency on the part of the British people during the darkest hour of their history. This can be attributed in part to the unwavering leadership of Winston Churchill, who coined the term "The Battle of Britain" before the attack began and used powerful speeches to bolster the spirits of the citizens. To conclude, here is a segment of one of his infamous pieces from July 14, 1940, called "War of the Unknown Warriors":
  8.  And now it has come to us to stand alone in the breach, and face the worst that the tyrant's might and enmity can do. Bearing ourselves humbly before God, but conscious that we serve an unfolding purpose, we are ready to defend our native land against the invasion by which it is threatened. We are fighting by ourselves alone; but we are not fighting for ourselves alone. Here in this strong City of Refuge which enshrines the title-deeds of human progress and is of deep consequence to Christian civilization; here, girt about by the seas and oceans where the Navy reigns; shielded from above by the prowess and devotion of our airmen-we await undismayed the impending assault. Perhaps it will come tonight. Perhaps it will come next week. Perhaps it will never come. We must show ourselves equally capable of meeting a sudden violent shock or-what is perhaps a harder test-a prolonged vigil. But be the ordeal sharp or long, or both, we shall seek no terms, we shall tolerate no parley; we may show mercy-we shall ask for none.
  9.      They are shattering words for undoubtedly the most shattering of times. Seventy-five years later, we are incredibly fortunate to recognize them as such.
  10. Thanks for reading,
  11. Delany


   

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Transcription Tuesday- Jonas Page

Good Morning bloggers! Welcome to this week’s Transcription Tuesday! This week in the ledger is a page addressed to Jonas Page. According to the Early History of Dunwhich Township 1790-1903,  an assessment roll of the Village of Tyrconnell in 1858 states Mr. Page had owned 2 lots (most lots in the time period were 1/5 to ¼ of an acre in size). Jonas Page also may have contributed to the Methodist community.  Many circuit-riders of the Methodist community often lodged at Henry Coyne’s hotel at Coyne’s Corner and in the homes surrounding it including Jonas Pages home.




*If you have more information on Jonas Page please feel free to contact us here at the Backus-Page House. Have a good week and don’t forget to tune in next week as we look at a page in the ledger addressed to James Blackwood.


Mon

Monday, July 13, 2015

Memory Mondays: Day Camp!

 Hi there!  I hope everyone is enjoying their Monday!

This week we are fondly remembering how great of a time our week of History Camp for Kids was last summer.  Not only did the participants learn a lot about the historical periods covered, they got to meet some neat presenters and use their creativity on a number of fun crafts.  We received great feedback and the kids left each day happy :)

Check out Day Camp this year too!  A day full of crafts and good
                                                       times in a different time period every Thursday in July and every
                                                       Wednesday in August.  See the link below for registration forms
                                                       and information.  Have a great day!

                                                      http://backuspagehouse.ca/event/history-camp-for-kids/